A series of 25 new artworks have popped up across the Tees Valley and it’s your job to discover them all as part of the new Tees Sculpture Trail.

Find the unique pieces of art as you enjoy a walk along the magnificent River Tees in a variety of spots across the region.

To complete the trail, head to Tees Sculpture Trail — River Tees Rediscovered and start planning your route.

Below are just a selection of the sculptures you can see along the way, for more go to Tees Sculpture Trail — River Tees Rediscovered.

Let us know which ones you spot by posting your photos on social media and tagging @enjoyteesvalley.

Piercebridge Touchstone by Russ Coleman

Our island was sculpted by ice when the planet warmed, so receding glaciers left erratics. Stones from another place further north were carried along in the ice. Ancient time travellers that helped shape this place.

The artist sculpts and polishes the stones to reveal their true beauty. Delicate yet robust each piece gives visitors a direct connection to the land on which they stand.

The piece is etched with words ‘Pro-gradi’, meaning slow progress from pro (advance before) gradi to walk forward.

Hurworth ‘Crossing Points’ by Andrew Mckeown 

The river’s bridges and bends influence the forms and shapes of these pieces. A ‘crossing point’ is also a ‘threshold’ to overcome; to get from where you are to where you want to be – reflecting the area’s future aspirations.

The pieces deliberately feel organic, as if they are ‘growing out of the ground’. Each a galvanised steel box section with etched words ‘Between two counties this great river flows’ to tie it with its particular location.

Newsham Grange Touchstone by Russ Coleman

Our island was sculpted by ice when the planet warmed, so receding glaciers left erratics. Stones from another place further north were carried along in the ice. Ancient time travellers that helped shape this place.

The artist sculpts and polishes the stones to reveal their true beauty. Delicate yet robust each piece gives visitors a direct connection to the land on which they stand.

The piece is etched with words

‘Sit and reflect eons and seconds, continents and fingertips.’

Egglescliffe ‘Crossing Points’ by Andrew Mckeown

The river’s bridges and bends influence the forms and shapes of these pieces. A ‘crossing point’ is also a ‘threshold’ to overcome; to get from where you are to where you want to be – reflecting the area’s future aspirations.

The pieces deliberately feel organic, as if they are ‘growing out of the ground’. Each a galvanised steel box section with etched words ‘Where opposing sides meet’ to tie it with this particular location.

Iron Masters Trail ‘Ship Seal’ by Steve Tomlinson 

Ship Seal.

Reflecting stories old and new – this weathering steel seal speaks of the former shipbuilding heritage of the Tees and how now that the water is cleaner, seals are encouraged to return.

Weathering (Corten) steel forms an oxide coating over the first few weeks, changing colour from steel to orange and then finally to brown.

Transporter Bridge ‘Crossing’ by Pat Walls

Cast iron on a sandstone plinth, the sculpture is a Möbius strip; a continuous loop with only one side, representing the connection between the North and South banks of the river.

The form of the sculpture is based on a triangle as the Transporter Bridge is a massive series of triangles. Cast iron was chosen to reflect the industry of the area.

Seaton Common ‘Steel River Curlew’ by Steve Tomlinson 

This weathering steel ‘Tidal Curlew’ reflects how local industry and nature now live side by side.

The curlew symbolises all the birds that make their home next to a heavy industrial area.

Weathering (Corten) steel forms an oxide coating over the first few weeks, changing colour from steel to orange and then finally to brown.

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